Docs Casting Investment

Originally made specifically to make platinum casting easier and more reliable, Docs’ is now used for many different purposes in the jewelry trade. Before Docs’ was introduced, platinum casting was a far less reliable process and it took two people to do it right. 1600 F was the correct casting temperature, a strain on any oven and the people working. Previous plasters were either very slow for the production cycle or at best left a rough surface, again increasing costs of production. Now we can employ clean crisp castings in a little as 3 hours. Stronger and faster.

Docs’ is not just for platinum anymore. Docs’ unique properties of strength and tolerance for extremely hot molten metals provide much more than better platinum casting. Ever need to cast twice in one day? Would a 3 hour casting cycle help you when a rush job is in? How about those tough cad cam models?

A few examples of metals best served by Docs’ include 950 or any Palladium and all palladium white golds. Plus consider those pesky rapid prototype models that are not a material that burns out easily. Those photopolymers or “resin” as I call them are great materials for cad cam. Really excellent surfaces and detail. But you need Docs’ to burn those out completely every time. You need an investment that has the strength to not cause flashing and to resist plaster breakaways inherent to certain popular designs. The cost for one box of Docs’ is $210 including the powder and the special safe handling binder.

The following charts will help you with initial settings and procedures. Docs’ comes with a set of instructions split into different needs. Platinum from shot wax is different than golf from a cad model so we have instructions for both in the box. All the instructions are online at our casting blog. Call the office for immediate tech support with any issues or questions. 800-999-7528 or 213-689-4872.

To order Docs online just click this link.

Material to Burn out Hours at 1400 F
Wax, Milled, Carved or Injection 2-3
Injected Plastics 2-4
Wax Like Printed 3d 2-3
Grown Resin 6-8
Metal To Cast Suggested Flask temp F.
90/10 or 95/5 Pt 500-600
950 Palladium 1050-1200
Gold 950-1100
Palladium white Golds 1050-1200

Questions?

800-999-7528 Toll Free
213-675-6178 Local

Your Order Content

• This investment is ideal for 90% or 95% platinum, 950 palladium, white gold with nickel or palladium, and any casting from carving wax, plastic, or any cad-cam model material that presents unusual burnout needs.

• Doc’s (Rapid prototype investment) is very different from regular gold, silver, and common platinum investment powders. Water to powder ratios and recommended working times are different and require your full attention to detail. The liquid to powder ratio is always 25/100 as compared to 40/100 for gypsum bonded investment powders. Doc’s is more forgiving than other investments with similar characteristics but that does not allow you to ignore the standard operating procedures. This investment appears much thicker than investment slurries that you may be used to and there is no need for concern. Doc’s will give you satin smooth castings if you follow the directions.

• Using chilled elixir (binder) will help to slightly extend your working time. You should consider your maximum working time to be 4 minutes and getting finished in as little as 3.5 minutes is even better. Because the working time is shorter, prepare your work and materials so that you can get the steps completed within the time allowed. Going beyond the recommended working time will cause you to have nodules on your castings caused by bubbles that were trapped during the extended investing process.

• As you will see later, 3 burnout schedule variations are recommended. The elixir/binder helps control the stress of the rapid expansion of the investment material

• This material can be used to cast flask less or with a flask. No flask liner is required however when using a steel flask it can make the removal of the material from the flasks after casting much easier. Use rubber sprue bases instead of absorbent material bases that are commonly used for platinum investment.

• Weigh your sprue base first before you attach your waxes and record that weight. After attaching your waxes, reweigh your base and record that weight. You will use this information to calculate the required amount of metal later.

• If you are using this material to simply overcome the defects that you encounter from the use of carving or RP waxes, you can just as well use a normal jewelry burnout cycle in the same oven as your normal daily production flasks.

CAD-CAM Considerations

The material used in the actual rapid prototype process makes all the difference. The most difficult Cad models are essentially a high technology resin, cured by light. They come in different colors each with it’s own advantages. For all of these you will need to use a very hot and very long burnout. 1600 Degrees Fahrenheit, and at least 8 hours. Doc’s has the extraordinary strength to withstand the natural expansion inherent to these models before they soften and burn out.

Cad designs often have some of the most difficult details, negative spaces and “choke points” for metal flow difficulties. Doc’s has the best chance to withstand the impact of molten metal flowing into thin places like small holes in the design. Doc’s in the investment of choice for designs with deep lettering.

Casting Temperature table
These are estimates based on general purpose casting.

Platinum 500-600F
950 Palladium 1000-1150F
Nickel white gold 1000-1150F
Palladium White gold 1000-1150F
Yellow Gold 850-1100F

Instructions for Doc’s with our Flaskless system

*For 1 flask (i.e. plastic type 3 1/4” x 2 3/4” o.d.)
1. 360 grams weighed from bulk box (all powder should be room temperature-70-75F. Liquid at 50-55F.)

A.) Place liquid in small plastic cake mixing bowl. (Do not use black rubber) Add powder to liquid. Wet powder thoroughly with stir stick. About 10 sec. 23 mls. Per 90 grams for bulk only. (Full strength solution) (92-93 mls for 360 grams).

B.) Use portable cake mixer with beaters (about $12.00) and mix wetted investment for 60 seconds at high speed, beating the mix vigorously with arm action. (Helps to make slurry more viscous)

C.) Tape a collar around top of bowl (if needed) and place under vacuum to boil for 30 seconds after investment rises and falls. (pound table with fists.)
Note: (Your vacuum equipment should reach at least 29.5” of vacuum and must do so quickly. If vacuum takes too long to reach boil, try a smaller bell jar. (9” or so) Or your vacuum may be too slow.

D.) Put high tape collar 3” around top of flask…pour investment down sides of flask quickly and place under vacuum. After start of boil, time for a two and one half (2.5) minute span or more under vacuum. Agitate vacuum table with fists constantly.

E.) Investment will start to thicken under vacuum resembling the “mud pots” at Yellowstone Park. Test fluidity by running your finger across bottom of bowl. Release vacuum slowly at 2 minutes and pound table with fists to settle the already thickening mix into the flask. Set aside undisturbed for 10 minutes total.

F.) Note: Flask should “glaze over” (lose its water on top) within about 3 minutes after set aside. Within 15 minutes, the top will develop a “mottled” look. Leave flask alone for another 15 or 20 minutes. Plastic should feel just warm-not hot. Pull the bottom, push the flask out of plastic breaking off the rim. Scrape smooth only on corners, do not scrape top of flask.

G.) The flask will steam noticeably,–reaching 120F. (If using a steel flask, use flask liner material and follow set times above.) Do not set the flask aside for any great length of time, such as all day or night. Proceed when the flask is ready.

H.) Place flask in cold oven to start. Then, immediately set the oven for 1250F. (If using a small electric kiln this rise should take about 45 minutes.) After reaching 1250 F., start timing for a two hour burnout. (More is not harmful…least can be 1 1/2 hours) (If time is not a factor, start with a cold oven and raise slowly to 1250 Fahrenheit. This helps eliminate cracks in the flask). You may also use any overnight program for casting.

I.) At 2 hour mark, pull flask from oven and place on bench set an egg timer for 30 minutes. (Walk away) At the 30 minute mark, flask temperature will be between 500F. and 600F. Or…you can turn off the oven and let it settle at 500F for at least an hour. Take from oven directly and cast. (If a large crack should appear, place the flask crack-side down in your cradle. Call Doc.)

J.) At the 28 minute mark place flask in cradle using only gloves. Crucible is loaded with platinum and pulled back from the flask on the arm of the machine. (Keep crucible away from flask during melting pushing it up to the flask right before you throw it.) Don’t dwell on the melt after the crucible joins the flask. No more than 1 second and then throw it. You should modify your machine to have a full cradle for the flask.

K.) Melt is started at 30 minute mark. 35 dwt. of platinum will melt within a minute or so. (Always use the larger Wesgo crucible) Take 5 or 10 seconds to super heat metal i.e. until a white “halo” appears around the entire pool of metal…a definite white ring. At that time, push the cradle/crucible up the arm to meet the flask. Immediately let the arm go. Don’t wait-have the metal ready before you push the crucible up.

L.) Let casted flask sit for 10 minutes. Break out (both flask and flask less) by whacking out with a hammer. Remove further investment by hammering the button hard rest of plaster crumbles. (If casting stones let sit until flask is cold.)

M.) Pickle in a solution designed for platinum investment removal. Some people use Hydrofluoric acid, but this is an extremely dangerous chemical. I strongly suggest you do not use this acid, purchase a safer alternative from your local toll or equipment supplier such as Frei & Borel, or Gesswein.

WAX PREP
Waxes should always be set up for “indirect contact” with the molten metal. On top of the cone in the base put a cross bar of 6 gauge wax wire attached with hot wax across the flask and setup waxes directly on the wire itself.
*Note: Waxes can be dipped in any regular wax dip. Doc prescribes any colored jewelry dip solution (red, blue, etc.) —I put two capfuls of it into 1 quart of isopropyl alcohol in a small tub for dipping. (Shake off and allow to air dry.

Approximate plat weights
2 medium bands on full crossbar=30-35 dwts.
1 medium band on ½ crossbar=20-25 dwts.
6-8 medium bands on double crossbar-65-75 dwts.

Note: For non stone in place casting you may use 1500 for your burnout temperature. If you have difficulty with these instructions or the process give Daniel a call at 800-999-7528 immediately. He can help.

General Open Air Mixing and Vacuum Bell De-airing:
Preparing to Mix:
1. Attach your waxes to your rubber sprue base, weigh, and record the weight without the flask.

2. Spray or dip your waxes into a debubblizer solution, gently sling or blow some of the debubblizer off with a mild compressed air line and set aside. It is not essential that the waxes be completely dry.

3. Measure the ID and height of your flask and calculate the materials necessary to fill the flasks. Use this formula to calculate.

(Flask Measurements in Inches)
((Diameter / 2) 2 X Height) * 3.1467) * 27 = Grams of investment required
Grams of investment required * .25 = ml/g of liquid required

4. Place your flask onto your sprue base and add your splashguard tape or sleeve onto the top of the flasks. Use a very tall splashguard because this material rises a great deal more than standard gypsum bonded investment material.

5. Use a mixing container with about 4 times the volume of the final slurry required. This mixture expands a lot more than regular investment if not vacuum mixing.

Mixing and Vacuum:
6. Put elixir/binder into the bowl first and add the powder on top of that.

7. Mix in bowl for 1 minute either by hand or in a mechanical mixer at slow speed. High speed only whips air into the mix.

8. Place bowl under your vacuum bell jar and apply vacuum for 1 minutes and release vacuum.

9. Quickly and carefully pour a thin stream directly onto the waxes and immediately place flasks under the vacuum bell. Be careful not to damage or break your waxes when pouring and moving.

10. Apply the vacuum for on the flasks for 1 minute more. You may need to relieve the vacuum slightly a time or two in order to keep the investment from going over the top of the flask and sleeve.

11. After you have finished the vacuum step, gently tap the vacuum table just a little to help ensure the release of all bubbles from your waxes. Make sure to have all this done by the end of 4 minutes.

12. Set the invested flask aside on a stable surface for 15 – 20 minutes or until the flasks starts to heat up due to the chemical reaction in the investment material.

13. When the flask starts to heat up, remove the sprue base and the splashguard. (About 15 – 20 min.)

14. It is best to wait for 1 hour before you put the flask into your oven.

Note: The internal flask temperature may reach as much as 120oF as the chemical bonding reaction takes place in the investment material and will start to melt some injection waxes. No detrimental effects to your casting can come as a result of this reaction.

Burnout schedules
Method A: (For larger flasks)
• Program your oven controller for a ramp rate from 4 degrees per minute to a maximum of 7 degrees per minute. This investment material is very resistant to shock so your ramp up speed can be faster than with gypsum-bonded investment.
• About 1 hour after investing, put the flask into an oven that is preheated to about 300oF (150oC), with the wax button facing down.
• Ramp directly up to your top burnout temperature of about 1350 oF – 1600oF, depending on the metal you are casting.
• Hold your top temperature for 2 – 4 hours depending on the amount of wax in the flask and the ending top temperature of your flasks. Lower top temps and higher wax content require a longer top temperature dwell times and higher top temperatures and lower wax content require shorter top temperature dwell times.
• If you are burning out photopolymer models use a 1600 degree 6-8 hour burnout.
• It is always a good idea to flip the flasks over around 1200oF in order to allow combustion gases to escape the mold but is not necessary for longer burnouts.
• Your final flask casting temperature will depend on your metal choice and the design of your parts.
• Quenching this material will not cause the investment to break away from your castings. This step is done at the appropriate time to give the maximum benefit to your metal crystal structure. You will then need to break away the investment using a hammer or a high-pressure water blast cabinet.

If you are using this material to simply overcome the defects that you encounter from the use of carving or RP waxes, you can just as well use a normal jewelry burnout cycle in the same oven as your normal daily production flasks.

Method B: (Smaller flasks or small flask-less castings)
Note: Casting flask-less is ideal with this type of material
• Program your oven controller for a ramp rate from 4 degrees per minute to a maximum of 10 degrees per minute. This investment material is very resistant to shock so your ramp up speed can be faster than with gypsum-bonded investment.
• About 1 hour after investing, put the flask into an oven that is preheated to about 300oF (150oC), with the wax button facing down.
• Ramp directly up to your top burnout temperature of about 1350 oF – 1600oF, depending on the metal you are casting.
• Hold your top temperature for 2 – 4 hours depending on the amount of wax in the flask and the ending top temperature of your flasks. Lower top temps and higher wax content require a longer top temperature dwell times and higher top temperatures and lower wax content require shorter top temperature dwell times.
• It is always a good idea to flip the flasks over around 1200oF in order to allow combustion gases to escape the mold but is not necessary for longer burnouts.
• Your final flask casting temperature will vary and depends on the type of metal that you choose and the design of your parts.
• Quenching this material will not cause the investment to break away from your castings. This step is done at the appropriate time to give the maximum benefit to your metal crystal structure. You will then need to break away the investment using a hammer or a high-pressure water blast cabinet.

Method C: Rapid Results (Smaller flasks or small flask-less castings with no stones)
This is an emergency burnout schedule. While Doc’s investment is designed to handle the stress, your casting surface may not be as smooth as it will be when using a less aggressive burnout schedule.

Note: Casting flask-less is ideal with this type of material
• Preheat your oven to between 1400oF and 1600oF
• About 1 hour after investing, put the flask into the preheated oven with the wax button facing down.
• When the heavy smoke stops coming out of the exhaust on your oven, flip the flask over with the opening facing up.
• If your oven was preheated to 1600oF then a complete burnout may be possible in as little as 30 minutes. When the flask opening looks clear and free of wax and carbon, you can turn the oven off and wait for it to reach the casting temperature that you are looking for or you can remove the flask from the oven and place it on a fireproof pad on your counter to cool.
o Lower top temps and higher wax content require a longer top temperature dwell times and higher top temperatures and lower wax content require shorter top temperature dwell times.
• Your final flask casting temperature will vary and depends on the type of metal that you choose and the design of your parts.
• The use of an optical pyrometer is ideal for measuring the temperature of the inside of the flasks by pointing it into the pour hole of the flask to take a reading.
• When you have reached your desired casting temperature, load your flask into your casting machine and cast.
• Quenching this material will not cause the investment to break away from your castings. This step is done at the appropriate time to give the maximum benefit to your metal crystal structure. You will then need to break away the investment using a hammer or a high-pressure water blast cabinet.

• Method D: Rapid 950 Palladium Results (Smaller flasks or small flask-less castings with no stones)
This is an emergency burnout schedule. While Doc’s investment is designed to handle the stress, your casting surface may not be as smooth as it will be when using a less aggressive burnout schedule.
Note: Casting flask-less is ideal with this type of material
• Preheat your oven to between 1400oF and 1600oF
• About 1 hour after investing, put the flask into the preheated oven with the wax button facing down.
• When the heavy smoke stops coming out of the exhaust on your oven, flip the flask over with the opening facing up.
• If your oven was preheated to 1600oF then a complete burnout may be possible in as little as 30 minutes. When the flask opening looks clear and free of wax and carbon, you can turn the oven off and wait for it to reach the casting temperature of about 1100 F., that you are looking for or you can remove the flask from the oven and place it on a fireproof pad on your counter to cool.
o Lower top temps and higher wax content require a longer top temperature dwell times and higher top temperatures and lower wax content require shorter top temperature dwell times.
• Your final flask casting temperature will vary with the design of your parts.
• The use of an optical pyrometer is ideal for measuring the temperature of the inside of the flasks by pointing it into the pour hole of the flask to take a reading.
• When you have reached your desired casting temperature, load your flask into your casting machine and cast.
• Quenching this material will not cause the investment to break away from your castings. This step is done at the appropriate time to give the maximum benefit to your metal crystal structure. You will then need to break away the investment using a hammer or a high-pressure water blast cabinet.

Wax Setting Burnouts:
Special Considerations:
• Flask-less casting works great for stone in wax and is much easier to breakout after casting.
• Many stones can be used when casting with stones in place. When casting with stones in place using any investment material, it is essential to never exceed a top temperature of 1150oF during the burnout when casting with diamonds. This means a much longer burnout schedule is required. This is not the same with other stones but is a good rule of thumb.
• For typical casting with stones, a maximum temperature ramp schedule of 4 degrees per minute up or down is suggested.

Method:
• About 1 hour after investing, put the flask into an oven that is preheated to about 300oF (150oC), with the wax button facing down and hold at that temperature for about 2 hours.
• Ramp directly up to your top burnout temperature of about 1150oF and hold for about 4 hours.
• Lower top temps and higher wax content require a longer top temperature dwell times and higher top temperatures and lower wax content require shorter top temperature dwell times.
• It is always a good idea to flip the flasks over at the top temperature in order to allow combustion gases to escape the mold. This is especially true for stone in wax casting.
• Your final flask casting temperature will vary and depends on the type of metal that you choose and the design of your parts.
• You should never quench your flasks when casting with stones in place until you can hold the flask comfortably in your bare hand. It is best to allow them to reach room temperature.
• You will then need to break away the investment using a hammer or a high-pressure water blast cabinet. When casing with stones it is best to do this in a container that allows you to find any loose or missing stones.

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
Colloidal Silica Binder Solution For “Docs’ Casting Plaster Only
SECTION I PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
TRADE NAME: Colloidal Silica
DESCRIPTION: A colloidal silica dispersion

HMIS RATING: HEALTH: 1 FLAMMABILITY: 0 REACTIVITY: 0
HAZARD RATINGS:
LEAST: 0 SLIGHT: 1 MODERATE: 2 HIGH: 3 EXTREME: 4

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SECTION II HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
Our hazard evaluation has identified the following chemical ingredient (s) as hazardous under OSHA’s Hazard Communication Rule, 29 CFR 1910.1200. Consult Section XIV for the nature of the hazard (s).
INGREDIENTS (s) CAS # APPROX.%
Amorphous silica 7631-86-9 40-70
Ingredients are listed on the TSCA Inventory of Chemical Substances. Those not identified are non-hazardous.
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SECTION III PRECAUTIONARY LABEL INFORMATION
CAUTION: Inhalation of mist or dust may be harmful. Avoid repeated or prolonged breathing of spray mist or dusts. Keep container closed when not in use. Use with adequate ventilation.
Empty containers may contain residual product. Do not reuse container unless properly reconditioned.

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SECTION IV FIRST AID INFORMATION
EYES: Flush with water for 15 minutes. Call a physician.
SKIN: Flush with water for 15 minutes.
INGESTION: Do not induce vomiting. Give water. Call a physician.
INHALATION: Remove to fresh air. Treat symptoms. Call a physician.
NOTE TO PHYSICIAN: No specific antidote is known. Based on the individual reactions of the patient, the physician’s judgment should be used to control symptoms and clinical condition.
CAUTION: If unconscious, having trouble breathing or in convulsions, do not induce vomiting or give water.

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SECTION V HEALTH EFFECTS INFORMATION
PRIMARY ROUTE (S) OF EXPOSURE: Eye, Skin, Inhalation
EYE CONTACT: Can cause mild, short-lasting irritation.
SKIN CONTACT: Can cause mild, short-lasting irritation.
IHHALATION: May cause irritation to the respiratory tract and lungs if dust is inhaled.
SYMPTOMS OF EXPOSURE:
CHRONIC: Amorphous silica. Prolonged inhalation of dust can cause pneumoconiosis.
AGGRAVATION OF EXISTING CONDITIONS: Prolonged inhalation of dust can increase lung injury in individuals with emphysema, asthma or other lung disorders.

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SECTION VI TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION
ACUTE TOXICITY STUDIES: Acute toxicity studies have not been conducted on this product, but acute studies have been conducted on a similar product. The results are shown below.
ACUTE ORAL TOXICITY (ALBINO RATS): LD50 = Greater than 15,380 mg/kg
Some hypo activity was exhibited at 10,250 mg/kg and above within 5 minutes after dosage which subsided within 6-22 hours. No pharmacotoxic symptoms were noted. Necropsy did not reveal any gross pathologic alterations.
PRIMARY SKIN IRRITATION TEST (ALBINO RABBIITS):
SKIN IRRITATION INDEX DRAIZE RATING: 0.4/8.0 Minimally irritating
COMMENTS: Some redness was noted at 24-hours only on the abraded backs which returned to normal at 72 hours. All intact skin sites showed no irritation at both 24 and 72 hours after contact.
PRIMARY EYE IRRITATION TEST (ALBINO RABBITS):
EYE IRRITATION INDEX DRAIZE RATING: 3.3/110.0 Minimally irritating
COMMENTS: Conjunctivitis, redness, was noted at 1-hour after contact. By 48-hours all irritation was gone. No corneal or iridial involvement was noted.
CHRONIC TOXICITY RESULTS ON: Prolonged inhalation of dust, if generated, may cause pneumonconiosis.
HUMAN HAZARD CHARACERIZATION: Based on our hazard characterization, the potential human hazard is: LOW

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SECTION VII PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
COLOR: Milky white FORM: Liquid ODOR: Odorless
DENSITY: 11.5-11.77 lbs/gal.
SOLUBILITY IN WATER: Completely
SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 1.38-1.40 @ 68C ASTM D-1298
pH (NEAT) = 9.8-10.2 ASTM E-70
VISCOSITY: 20cps @ 77F ASTM D-2983
BOILING POINT: 100C @ 760 mm Hg ASTM D-86
FLASH POINT: None
NOTE: These physical properties are typical values for this product.

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SECTION VIII FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION
FLASH POINT: None
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA: Not applicable

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SECTION IX REACTIVITY INFORMATION
INCOMPATIBILITY: Avoid contact with aluminum.
Avoid contact with strong acids (e.g. sulfuric, phosphoric, nitric, hydrochloric, chromic, sulfonic) which can generate heat, splattering or boiling and the release of toxic fumes.

SECTION X PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT
RESPRIATORY PROTECTION: Respiratory protection is not normally needed since the volatility and toxicity are low. If significant vapors, mists or aerosols are generated, wear a NIOSH approved or equivalent respirator.
For large spills, entry into large tanks, vessels or enclosed small spaces with inadequate ventilation, a positive pressure, self-contained breathing apparatus is recommended.
VENTILATION: General ventilation is recommended.
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Use impermeable gloves and chemical splash goggles when attaching feeding equipment or doing maintenance.
If clothing is contaminated, remove clothing and thoroughly wash the affected area. Launder contaminated clothing before reuse.
HUMAN EXPOSURE CHARACTERIZATION: Based on PACE Technologies Consumables recommended product application and our recommended personal protective equipment, the potential human exposure is LOW

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SECTION XI SPILL AND DISPOSAL INFORMATION
SPILL CONTROL AND RECOVERY:
Small liquid spills: Contain with absorbent material, such as clay, soil or any commercially available absorbent. Shovel reclaimed liquid and absorbent into recovery or salvage drums for disposal. Refer to CERCLA in Section XIV.
Large liquid spills: Dike to prevent further movement and reclaim into recovery or salvage drums or tank truck for disposal. Refer to CERCLA in Section XIV.
DISPOSAL: If this product becomes a waste, it does not meet the criteria of a hazardous waste as defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 40 CFR 261, since it does not have the characteristics of Subpart C, nor is it listed under Subpart D. As a non-hazardous liquid waste, it should be solidified with stabilizing agents (such as sand, fly ash, or cement) so that no free liquid remains before disposal to an industrial waste landfill. A non-hazardous liquid waste can also be deep-well injected in accordance with local, state and federal regulations.

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SECTION XII ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION
If released into the environment, see CERCLA in Section XIV.
ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD AND EXPOSURE CHARACTERIZATION: Based on our Hazard Characterization, the potential environmental hazard is: LOW.
Based on PACE Technologies recommended product application and the product’s characteristics, the potential environmental exposure is: LOW.

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SECTION XIII TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
PROPER SHIPPING NAME/HAZARD CLASS MAY VARY BY PACKAGING, PROPERITES, AND MODE OF TRANSPORTATION. TYPICAL PROPER SHIPPING NAMES FOR THIS PRODUCT ARE:
ALL TRANSPORTATION MODES: PRODUCT IS NOT REGULATED DURING TRANSPORTATION

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SECTION XIV REGULATORY INFORMAITON
The following regulations apply to this product.
FEDERAL REGULATIONS:
OSHA’S HAZARD COMMUNICATION RULE, 29 CFR 1910.1200:
Based on our hazard evaluation, the following ingredient in this product is hazardous and the reason is shown below.
Amorphous silica = TWA 10 mg/m3 (total dust) ACGIH/TLV
Amorphous silica = TWA 6 mg/m3 OSHA/PEL
CERCLA/SUPERFUND, 40 CFR 117, 302:
Notification of spills of this product is not required.
SARA/SUPERFUND AMENDMENTS AND REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 1986
(TITLE III) – SECTIONS 302, 311, 312 AND 313:
SECTION 302 – EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES (40 CFR 355):
This product does not contain ingredients listed in Appendix A and B as an Extremely Hazardous Substance.
SECTIONS 311 and 312 – MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET REQUIREMENTS (40 CFR 370):
Our hazard evaluation has found this product to be hazardous. The product should be reported under the following EPA hazard categories:
XX Immediate (acute) health hazard
XX Delayed (chronic) health hazard
— Fire hazard
— Sudden release of pressure hazard
— Reactive hazard
Under SARA 311 and 312, the EPA has established threshold quantities for the reporting of hazardous chemicals. The current thresholds are: 500 pounds or the threshold planning quantity (TPQ), whichever is lower, for extremely hazardous substances and 10,000 pounds for all other hazardous chemicals.
SECTION 313 – LIST OF TOXIC CHEMICALS (40 CFR 372): This product does not contain ingredients on the List of Toxic Chemicals.
TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (TSCA): The chemical ingredients in this product are on the 8(b) Inventory List (40 CFR 710).
RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA), 40 CRF 261 SUBPART C & D: Consult Section XI for RCRA classification.
FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT, CLEAN WATER ACT, 40 CFR 401.15 (formally Sec. 307), 40 CFR 116 (formerly Sec. 311): None of the ingredients are specifically listed.
CLEAN AIR ACT, Sec. 111 (40 CFR 60), Sec. 112 (40 CFR 61, 1990 Amendments), Sec. 611 (40 CFR 82, CLASS I and II Ozone depleting substances): This product does not contain ingredients covered by the Clean Air Act.
STATE REGULATIONS:
CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65:
This product does not contain any chemicals that require warning under California Proposition 65.
MICHIGAN CRITICAL MATERIALS:
This product does not contain ingredients listed on the Michigan Critical Materials Register.
STATE RIGHT TO KNOW LAWS:
Regulated in those states using the TLV for amorphous silica as a criteria for listing.

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SECTION XV ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
None

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SECTION XVI RISK CHARACTERIZATION
Due to our commitment to Product Stewardship, we have evaluated the human and environmental hazards and exposures of this product. Based on our recommended use of this product, we have characterized the product’s general risk. This information should provide assistance for your own risk management practices. We have evaluated our product’s risk as follows:
• The human risk is: LOW
• The environmental risk is: LOW
Any use inconsistent with PACE Technologies recommendations may affect our risk characterization. Our sales representative will assist you to determine if your product application is consistent with our recommendations. Together we can implement an appropriate risk management process.
This product material safety data sheet provides health and safety information. The product is to be used in applications consistent with our product literature. Individuals handling this product should be informed of the recommended safety precautions and should have access to this information. For any other uses, exposures should have access to this information. For any other uses, exposures should be evaluated so that appropriate handling practices and training programs can be established to insure safe workplace operations. Please consult your local sales representative for any further information.

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SECTION XVII OTHER INFORMATION
FOR COMPANY USE
THE INFORMATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS SET FORTH HEREIN ARE TAKEN FROM SOURCES BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE AS OF THE DATE HEREOR: HOWEVER PACE TECHNOLOGIES MAKES NO WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION OR THE SUITABILITY OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS, AND ASSUMES NO LIABILITY TO ANY USER THEREOF.

DATE PREPARED: 2/04/03

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Order prices are shown for estimate purposes only. We'll follow up with final pricing based on precious metal prices at time of order fulfillment. Dismiss